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Sunday, August 14, 2022
ArlingtonSchools & Military, 3/25/21 edition

Schools & Military, 3/25/21 edition

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News of the achievements of local students and members of the Armed Forces.

  • Valerie Marshall of Arlington, a 2017 graduate of Yorktown High School, has been elected to the Phi Beta Kappa academic honor society at Washington & Lee University.
  • Gabrielle Sorresso of Arlington, a graduate of Yorktown High School, has been named to the dean’s list with distinction for the fall semester at Colgate University.
  • Colin MacEwen of Arlington, a graduate of Washington-Lee High School; John Schoen of Arlington, a graduate of Yorktown High School; Katherine Bertrand Ortiz of Arlington, a graduate of J.E.B. Stuart High School; and Duncan Wieland of Arlington, a graduate of Washington-Lee High School have been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Colgate University.
  • Andrew Collins of Arlington has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at St. Mary’s College of Maryland.
  • Jay McCormick, the son of James and Jariya McCormick of Arlington and a graduate of Washington-Lee High School, has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Centre College.
  • Allison McGlone, Lilith Pilkerton and Robert Gessel of Arlington have been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Emerson College.
  • Albert Castro and Gina DeLancy of Arlington have been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at The Citadel.
  • Carly Canino of Arlington has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Canisius College.
  • Charlotte Jones of Arlington has been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Bates College.
  • Danielle Ribalta, Tim Dare, Heather Dishongh and Sierra Mullins of Arlington have received awards of excellence in academic achievement at Western Governors University.
  • Ciaran Lyons, Charles Kniseley, Oscar Lujan and Wilhemina Solley of Arlington are currently serving with the National Civilian Community Corps, a 10-month program sponsored by AmeriCorps.

They are completing a series of different projects (from six to 12 weeks long) in different parts of the nation, ranging from disaster relief to urban development.

“I strongly believe that one person can change the world for the better, and being able to work as a team allows even more good to be accomplished,” Lujan said. “I am sure that my time in AmeriCorps will help prepare me for future challenges while giving me insight into the needs of different communities and how I can make a difference in the world.”

Lyons attended H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program and graduated in 2020 from the College of Wooster with a bachelor of arts degree in political science.

Kniseley attended Yorktown High School, Lujan Washington-Liberty High School and Solley the International School of Azerbaijan and the University of Mary Washington.

“I knew that I needed to do something to make a positive impact in the middle of so much negativity,” Solley said. “This pandemic has really exposed a lot of problems that are facing citizens in the U.S.”

Participants in the National Civilian Community Corps, who must be between 18 and 26 years old (no upper age limit for team leaders), receive a small living stipend and $6,345 to help pay for college, in exchange for at least 1,700 hours of service during the program.

For information, see the Website at www.americorps.gov/nccc.

  • Gibson Cameron of Arlington, a student at McDaniel College, played a behind-the-scenes role in the production of the comedy “Speech & Debate” at the college in early March.

Cameron served as an electrician, scene constructor and stagehand.

  • Marymount University plans fully in-person instruction in the fall, university officials say, along with a return to a more “normal” college experience for students in regard to resident life, athletics and campus activities.

For both the fall 2020 and spring 2021 semesters, Marymount has been operating through a hybrid model that has allowed students to take classes either on campus or remotely. No positive COVID-19 cases at Marymount have been traced back to classroom settings, officials said.

“We have done everything possible to keep our students and employees safe,” university president Irma Becerra said. “ Reaching this point where we can make a full return to in-person learning and living is thanks to our community members as a whole, who have all played a part in our collective success.”

All resident students, student-athletes, commuters registered for in-person classes, faculty who teach in-person classes and identified staff members were tested for COVID-19 prior to the start of classes in January. In addition, Marymount recently joined other DC-area universities in the rollout of an innovative saliva-based COVID-19 testing system, Shield T3, with a mobile laboratory located at Gallaudet University.

Marymount is currently processing about 5,000 tests per week through the Shield T3 lab to monitor student-athletes and conduct enhanced “surveillance testing.”

Marymount also is working on a campus plan for vaccination for when it becomes available to colleges and universities. In Virginia, essential workers at higher education institutions are eligible for COVID-19 vaccines in the upcoming Phase 1C.

Students with “unique circumstances” may be allowed to opt out of fully in-person instruction and participate in either a hybrid or remote format this fall, university officials said.

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