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Wednesday, February 8, 2023
ArlingtonFood pantry reports record-setting usage in November

Food pantry reports record-setting usage in November

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Even as the impact of COVID begins to dissipate among clients of the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC), now their lives are being upended by uncertain economic conditions.

“Inflation has set back our families just as they were recovering from the hardships of the pandemic,” the organization’s CEO, Charles Meng, wrote in a letter to supporters. “As a sign for what we might expect in the future, we now have the highest number of active referrals ever – 5,208 families.”

AFAC provided Thanksgiving groceries, turkeys and chickens to more than 3,200 Arlington families in need this year, part of the month of November that saw the largest number (24,468) individuals served in a single month, Meng said.

“With the help of our hard-working and dedicated volunteers, we will meet this challenge as we have met all those of the few last years,” he said. “Thank you for your help and for your care for all those who come to us.”
The week prior to Christmas, families coming to AFAC for groceries received a chicken roaster, fresh produce, milk, eggs and bread for a holiday meal.

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Even as the impact of COVID begins to dissipate among clients of the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC), now their lives are being upended by uncertain economic conditions.

“Inflation has set back our families just as they were recovering from the hardships of the pandemic,” the organization’s CEO, Charles Meng, wrote in a letter to supporters. “As a sign for what we might expect in the future, we now have the highest number of active referrals ever – 5,208 families.”

AFAC provided Thanksgiving groceries, turkeys and chickens to more than 3,200 Arlington families in need this year, part of the month of November that saw the largest number (24,468) individuals served in a single month, Meng said.

“With the help of our hard-working and dedicated volunteers, we will meet this challenge as we have met all those of the few last years,” he said. “Thank you for your help and for your care for all those who come to us.”
The week prior to Christmas, families coming to AFAC for groceries received a chicken roaster, fresh produce, milk, eggs and bread for a holiday meal.

In a sign that a post-COVID world continues to emerge, AFAC has announced that its annual “Empty Bowls” fund-raiser will be back in person in 2023 for the first time since the pandemic. It is slated for Feb. 12, with tickets going on sale in early January.

Even as the impact of COVID begins to dissipate among clients of the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC), now their lives are being upended by uncertain economic conditions.

“Inflation has set back our families just as they were recovering from the hardships of the pandemic,” the organization’s CEO, Charles Meng, wrote in a letter to supporters. “As a sign for what we might expect in the future, we now have the highest number of active referrals ever – 5,208 families.”

AFAC provided Thanksgiving groceries, turkeys and chickens to more than 3,200 Arlington families in need this year, part of the month of November that saw the largest number (24,468) individuals served in a single month, Meng said.

“With the help of our hard-working and dedicated volunteers, we will meet this challenge as we have met all those of the few last years,” he said. “Thank you for your help and for your care for all those who come to us.”
The week prior to Christmas, families coming to AFAC for groceries received a chicken roaster, fresh produce, milk, eggs and bread for a holiday meal.

In a sign that a post-COVID world continues to emerge, AFAC has announced that its annual “Empty Bowls” fund-raiser will be back in person in 2023 for the first time since the pandemic. It is slated for Feb. 12, with tickets going on sale in early January.

Even as the impact of COVID begins to dissipate among clients of the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC), now their lives are being upended by uncertain economic conditions.

“Inflation has set back our families just as they were recovering from the hardships of the pandemic,” the organization’s CEO, Charles Meng, wrote in a letter to supporters. “As a sign for what we might expect in the future, we now have the highest number of active referrals ever – 5,208 families.”

AFAC provided Thanksgiving groceries, turkeys and chickens to more than 3,200 Arlington families in need this year, part of the month of November that saw the largest number (24,468) individuals served in a single month, Meng said.

“With the help of our hard-working and dedicated volunteers, we will meet this challenge as we have met all those of the few last years,” he said. “Thank you for your help and for your care for all those who come to us.”
The week prior to Christmas, families coming to AFAC for groceries received a chicken roaster, fresh produce, milk, eggs and bread for a holiday meal.

In a sign that a post-COVID world continues to emerge, AFAC has announced that its annual “Empty Bowls” fund-raiser will be back in person in 2023 for the first time since the pandemic. It is slated for Feb. 12, with tickets going on sale in early January.

For information, see the Website at www.afac.org.

For information, see the Website at www.afac.org.

In a sign that a post-COVID world continues to emerge, AFAC has announced that its annual “Empty Bowls” fund-raiser will be back in person in 2023 for the first time since the pandemic. It is slated for Feb. 12, with tickets going on sale in early January.

For information, see the Website at www.afac.org.

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